Tag Archives: CCR

safeBERM mentioned in WasteAdvantage Magazine

EnCAP-IT is pleased to announce that the company’s safeBERM® was mentioned in the national publication, WasteAdvantage Magazine. The article, entitled “The Benefits of an Encapsulated Mechanically Stabilized Earthen (eMSE) Berm”, was published in the October 2019 edition of WasteAdvantage Magazine.

Link to WasteAdvantage Magazine article

PDF of WasteAdvantage Magazine article

EnCAP-IT is exhibiting at the GA SWANA 2019 Annual Fall Conference on November 18-20, 2019.

EnCAP-IT is exhibiting at the GA SWANA Annual Fall Conference on November 18-20, 2019.

The conference is for industry professionals; at a great location, offering a chance to catch up with industry friends and make new contacts. Hosted by the Georgia SWANA chapter.

Being held at:

Jekyll Island Club Resort
Jekyll Island, GA

Come by and see us!

EnCAP-IT is exhibiting at the NWRA 2019 Southeast Annual Conference on October 28-29, 2019.

EnCAP-IT is exhibiting at the NWRA 2019 Southeast Annual Conference on October 28-29, 2019.

The conference is for industry professionals; at a great location, offering a chance to catch up with industry friends and make new contacts. Hosted by the Florida and Georgia chapters.

Being held at:

The Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort
Savannah, GA
www.wasterecycling.org

Come by and see us!

EnCAP-IT is exhibiting at WasteCON 2019 Conference on October 21-24, 2019.

Meet EnCAP-IT at SWANA WasteCON 2019, October 21-24, at the Phoenix Convention Center. Visit us in Booth 637!

This year’s conference is themed “Pathway to Innovation” and will feature interactive activities, tools and resources for solid waste leaders to explore the most important issues and find innovative and sustainable solutions for our environmental challenges.” – SWANA

– Being held at:

Phoenix Convention Center
Phoenix, AZ

Come by and see us!

EnCAP-IT is exhibiting at the NWRA 2019 Mid-Atlantic Annual Conference at the start of next month October 1-2, 2019.

EnCAP-IT is exhibiting at the NWRA 2019 Mid-Atlantic Annual Conference at the start of next month October 1-2, 2019.  

The conference is for industry professionals in the Mid-Atlantic Region …

Being held at:

The Omni Grove Park Inn
290 Macon Drive
Asheville, NC 28804

Come by and see us!

From the Desk of the Utility CEO

The CEO in the corner office of any large organization has a lonely existence.

CEOs of utilities may feel even more isolated – but it’s not mandatory.

The energy industry is steadily evolving beyond fossil fuels and shifting to more renewable and sustainable sources. This is fantastic news for the planet, but before this transformation can be complete, we must address the fossil fuel legacy of nearly 2 billion tons of coal ash stored in inefficient and environmentally perilous ways all over the United States.

The buck for this state of affairs sits squarely on the desk of the utility CEO, while the pressure to provide answers pours in from all directions: political forces, environmental groups, ratepayers, internal managers, the board of directors and major investors.

Large companies usually establish methods and infrastructure with adequate manpower and resources to handle legacy CCR issues. But as new methods come to the market to deal with CCR more efficiently — yes, it happens — existing infrastructure may find itself calcified, too set in its ways. (“This is how we’ve always done it.”) Instead of being able to nimbly change course and adapt, it fractures or even collapses under the pressure.

Early CCR deposition strategies have relied on the “Cap-In-Place” method. However the science behind it, which CEOs and their teams have traditionally believed to be “the safest” is, in fact, unable to support the environmental and business risks that approach entails.

With that option now off the table, the buck flies back to the CEO whose job is to lead the way by forging a middle path that will satisfy all stakeholders going forward.

The first — and easiest — question a CEO might ask is, “Is there another one solution to fit all?”

The answer to that is easy. It’s no. (That was destroyed in the last Avengers movie.)

Without another simple strategy like good old out-of-sight-out-of-mind cap in place, the next logical area to explore is hybrid approaches.

It’s the way of today and the future to pursue multiple solutions that all contribute to the goal of proper CCR deposition.

The good news is that CEOs who can present multiple solutions to their boards, internal managers and external stakeholders dramatically increase their negotiating power and chances of success by having more than one card to play.

It seems hard to believe that groups around the country have been wrestling with this issue of what to do with legacy CCR for almost 11 years. The nation is making progress. We’ve realized that cap in place is virtually never the answer, and we’re developing alternatives. However, most of the work is yet to be done, and dealing with 2 billion tons of anything can take decades, but we have to start somewhere.

CEOs have the resources, tools and stature to jump-start any CCR deposition project by considering all their options so they can guide stakeholders toward wise decisions and action.

Next, we’ll step away from the corner office and consider the perspective of stakeholders who have been locked in CCR trench warfare for over a decade.

EnCAP-IT, will be exhibiting at the SWANA 2019 Quad State Conference – NC, SC, VA, TN, August 27-30, 2019.

EnCAP-IT is exhibiting at the SWANA 2019 Quad State Conference – NC, SC, VA, TN at the end of the month August 27 – 30, 2019.  

The conference is for industry professionals in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee…

Being held at:

Crowne Plaza-Asheville
1 Resort Drive
Asheville, NC 28806

Come by and see us! (Booth 10)

CCR Innovation Series: Part 3 of 3

It takes a village to solve the looming CCR storage issue.

In all discussions of coal ash disposition — either through beneficial reuse or keeping it intact but contained — the overriding concern is safety.

The cap-in-place solution has been solidly debunked from a safety standpoint. The market for beneficial use of coal ash in building products still lags far behind the over-abundance of legacy CCR. Yes, the market may eventually catch up, but leaving toxic CCR in the ground indefinitely while it waits for a new home isn’t an option.

Government regulations have necessitated more rapid and safe disposition, raising these questions for stakeholders:

  • What method to use?
  • How long will it take to implement?
  • What will it cost?

New regulations in Virginia and North Carolina, and pending legislation in Illinois, are harbingers of what’s to come as utilities find themselves compelled by law to find innovative ways to dispose of their legacy CCR. Drying and excavation is a monumental challenge, but the challenge doesn’t stop there. Excavation results in large stockpiles that need to be properly stored. Indecision over how to proceed, or an inability to pick a middle path for all stakeholders, only compounds the problem.

When engineers in ancient Egypt cut and laid the first limestone block, they probably wondered if and when their project would ever end. But that didn’t stop them from marshalling their forces to stack block upon block for years until they finally had a pyramid.

Similarly, it’s the duty of all stakeholders in the CCR dilemma to rise up and conquer the challenges they face today, one site at a time, until no CCR is left behind.

If we take inspiration from the famous Nike slogan, “JUST DO IT,” resolutions to the most vexing problems become fairly straightforward:

“The impounded coal ash is too close to a waterway.” — MOVE IT.

“We don’t have enough land to store the impounded coal ash.” — FIND WAYS TO MAXIMIZE IT.

“We can’t beneficiate all the ash within the 15-year deadline.” — SAFELY STORE IT.

“Our on-site landfill is susceptible to hurricanes and flooding.” — SHORE IT UP.

“There’s no one solution that fits all.” — SO TACKLE IT WITH MULTIPLE SOLUTIONS.

“We don’t want to burden our ratepayers.” — FIND WAYS TO FIX IT THAT PROVIDE THE MOST BANG FOR THE BUCK.

“It costs too much to safely store this much coal ash.” — SHOW US WHY IT DOES.

Utilities have typically been less than transparent in divulging their methods and costs. Ironically, this has forced environmentalists and affected citizens to become much better educated and organized, making them potent potential allies equipped to bring new ideas to the table.

Now’s the time for everyone to come together, think together, and determine best practices for dealing with CCR in their communities. Whether it’s safe storage now to become inventory for future beneficial use, permanent on-site disposition or relocation, the answers are out there. It takes a village to find them.